Stepping Out of the Darkness: Rochester

2071610400_bae6e8b192_zIf the above title sounds a bit familiar, this is because it is a play on the annual mental health and suicide prevention walk titled “Out of the Darkness,” an event in which the Rochester area participates every September, and sadly not the result of any show of original, rapier wit on my part. It is, however, an important acknowledgment of something that needs sorely to be discussed: mental health and the local resources that are available to those who may need to reach out.

Because mental health tends to be one of those subjects that worms its way out of public discourse, the relevant sources of aid often face neglect in the way of advertisement. It can be difficult for individuals to find the help that they may need or want – and yet areas like Rochester, and even those parts of Rochester within walking distance of the Nazareth campus, harbor quite an impressive wealth of resources. 

We are all aware as to the recent change to the title of our health center to make it “The Health and Counseling Center.” This name change reflects just how strongly our counseling services are on the campus itself – we’ve an impressive team of counselors, specialists, a psychiatrist and staff educated and connected to the larger Rochester network. Each Monday, Dr. John Connors, a well-known psychiatrist with a private practice mere minutes from campus, comes to the center and provides free services to Nazareth students, including medication management, prescriptions and evaluative resources.  The center also offers free and recurring therapy sessions with members of their certified faculty, who all boast high qualifications and reputations for providing wonderful experiences, all things I can vouch for on a personal level.

6314428813_7863b893df_zSaid resources extend far beyond our campus, and yet there are many almost as close. St. John Fisher, our friends from across the street, hosts an eating disorder support group that meets on Tuesday evenings. There are several accessible group resources of a similar variety nearby, ranging from free, insurance accepting, and $20-$40 per session. These include the classic support system for issues such as addiction, depression, bipolar, OCD and anxiety disorders, and therapeutic resources, such as Dialectical Behavior Therapy workshops located right in Brighton.

More specified searches can easily be conducted on the local Mental Health Association page. Likewise, long term, clinical and emergency psychological care is available 24/7 at major hospitals, the most popular of which being Strong Memorial and Rochester General.

 

Those seeking individual therapy and any more information about rescources may use the very popualr and proffesionaly recommended directory at Psychology Todayvisit or call our local MHA office at (585) 325-3145 and 320 N.Goodman Street, Rochester, or pay a visit to our own Health and Counseling Center.

The moral of this story, as compact as it is, is fairly simple. It is speaks of the help that is available, the hope that it may provide, and the reassurance that we, as a city and as people, may continue to emerge from the dark and walk into the light.

Photos by Carmelo Speltino and Khalid Albaih

Mary Walrath

Mary Walrath, a native of Gloversville and adopted resident of Rochester New York, is a communications and media writing major and sociology minor at Nazareth college. She is currently an intern at the Friends and Foundation of the Rochester Public Library as the communications and media manager surrounding the 2016 Shakespearean events and writes for several published platforms. Her academic focuses and career goals include working in the fields of journalism and authoring, titles significantly shorter than those she holds currently. She will always be a sociology and literary lover at heart and will likely never stop annoying her friends with detailed analysis of every book she ever reads.

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